10 Year Anniversary Celebrations

Dunedin Chinese Garden - Ten Year Celebrations

Dunedin Chinese Garden 10-year Anniversary Scholars’ Celebration

The Dunedin Chinese Garden, in conjunction with the Dunedin Chinese Gardens Trust and the University of Otago Office of the Confucius Institute in Auckland, proudly presents the visiting scholars series in recognition of the Garden’s 10th birthday.

Bookings are essential for all events. All events are held in the Tower Room.

For bookings please contact the Dunedin Chinese Garden ph 03 477 3248 or email chinesegarden@dcc.govt.nz

Normal admission charges apply. Children under 13 FREE (maximum three per adult).

August

How to look at a work of Chinese calligraphy

Dr Xiongbo Shi – Assistant Professor in Institute of Aesthetics and Art Criticisms at Shenzhen University

For over 1700 years, shufa (calligraphy) has been an elite art that is prized above all other arts in China. Dr Xiongbo Shi introduces the scripts, genres and artistic forms of Chinese shufa concluding with an authentic calligraphic presentation.

Saturday 25 August | 1pm

September

Creating the Cantonese Pacific: trade, migration, and environmental change - 1790s – 1920s

Associate Professor James Beattie – Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington

Associate Professor James Beattie explores the role of Chinese markets and especially Cantonese people in driving ecological and social change in the Pacific, with a special emphasis on New Zealand. With acknowledgement to Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington

Friday 7 September | 1pm

Rewi Alley, the Cold War and the art of museum diplomacy in China and New Zealand

Associate Professor James Beattie – Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington

Associate Professor Richard Bullen – University of Canterbury Research Fellow, Canterbury Museum

Richard Bullen discusses how Canterbury Museum came to acquire the largest collection of Chinese material in the southern hemisphere during the Cold War. This is followed by the launch of New China Eyewitness, written by Richard Bullen and James Beattie. This book shares the fascinating account of the 1956 visit to the People’s Republic of China by a group of prominent New Zealanders and documents Canterbury Museum’s unique acquisition. Copies available for purchase and signing by the authors.

Friday 7 September | 4pm

A Garden on a Plate: willow pattern design and world history

Associate Professor James Beattie – Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington

Associate Professor James Beattie reveals the fascinating links between Muslim merchants, Kublai Khan’s Mongol dynasty, opium smuggling, blue and white porcelain, and New Zealand. With acknowledgement to Science in Society, Victoria University of Wellington

Saturday 8 September | 1pm

Long-lasting Friendship between Yu and Lan

This photographic display showcases the beauty of one of China’s best gardens. Built in 1559 AD, in the Ming Dynasty, the Yu Garden is the largest ancient architectural complex at  the heart of Shanghai’s Old Town.

Opens 15 September

China on screens: from shadow play to digital animation

Dr Paola Voci – University of Otago, Department of Language and Cultures

Focusing on Chinese animation as a window to understand both the past and the present of Chinese visual culture, Associate Professor Paola Voci explores ‘electric shadows’ – the Chinese name for cinema 电影 dianying.

Saturday 15 September| 1pm

Archaeological investigations of nineteenth century Chinese goldfield communities in Central Otago.

Professor Richard Walter – Head of Department, Anthropology and Archaeology

University of Otago Professor Richard Walter

Discuss the experience of 19th century Chinese settlers in the goldfields of Central Otago and the influence of the Lawrence Chinese Camp on Chinese culture and society in Aotearoa.

Friday 21 September | 1pm

Object.Affection: Dialogues with ancestors

Object.Affection is a creative collaboration between renowned photographic historian King Tong Ho and members of the local Chinese community. It reflects history through the interface between visuals (photographs) and the contextual (English and Chinese bilingual texts).

22 September 2018 – 10 February 2019 |Toitū Otago Settlers Museum (Chinese Garden end)

In conjunction with Chinese Language Week 23-39 September:

Chinese Moon Festival

Help us celebrate this special occasion with cultural activities and performances.

Sunday 23 September | 10am – 5pm

Reading Chinese in the Garden: the book, the collection, and the library.

Duncan Campbell (adjunct Teaching Fellow with Victoria University of Wellington).

Unearth more on the Chinese book and its evolution at this illustrated talk by Duncan Campbell, adjunct Teaching Fellow with Victoria University of Wellington.

Friday 28 September |1pm

The language of the flowers - the role of plants in traditional Chinese culture.

Duncan Campbell (adjunct Teaching Fellow with Victoria University of Wellington).

Duncan Campbell will discuss the connection, symbolism and importance behind the garden elements.

Saturday 29 September |1pm

October

Learn to transcend time and space by copying Chinese painting

Boyi Gan – Mona Lisa Art Studio Art Director.

Be guided on the use of watercolour pencils with artist Boyi Gan showing step by step how to copy a Chinese painting. Material and brushes will be provided.

Saturday 6 October | 10.30 am – 12.30 pm | $20 materials cost plus Garden entry

Penjing demonstration

Penjing (pot scenery in Chinese) is an art form using trees grown in containers with rocks and other materials to create in miniature the representation of a natural landscape.  It is a living art form taking inspiration from Chinese landscape painting. Learn the fundamentals from Brian Ellis, penjing expert.

Saturday 20 October | 1pm

November

Chinese creative musical practices in the making of New Zealand

Professor Henry Johnson – University of Otago.

How did Chinese creative musical practices contribute to the making of Aotearoa New Zealand from the mid-nineteenth century? Professor Henry Johnson explores how practices help contextualise a significant sphere of cultural diversity in colonial and postcolonial context.

10 November | 1pm

For all the tea in China (and who stole some of it …)

Dr Maria Galikowski – Senior Lecturer and Convenor of the Chinese Programme, Waikato University

Dr. Maria Galikowski discusses the historical and cultural significance of Chinese tea, as a local product and global commodity.

Saturday 17 November | 1pm

Alexander Don and the Chinese gold miners

Jane Thomsen –Director. & Rachel Hurd - Archivist

Jane Thomsen and Rachel Hurd share the story of the Ng New Zealand Chinese Heritage Collection, its links to the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand, and how it came to be listed on the UNESCO New Zealand Memory of the World Register. Saturday 24 November | 1pm

Saturday 24 November | 1pm

January

The Shanghai Sessions

Professor Martin Lodge – University of Waikato Conservatorium of Music

Composers from NZ, China, USA, UK and India along with the renowned Polaris Quartet of Shanghai collaborated on an album of newly commissioned music in March 2017. Martin Lodge, composer and executive producer, tells the story of the album from conception through to English/Chinese publication.

Saturday 12 January | 1pm

February

From China to Japan: the transformation of taste in tea ritual

Associate Professor Richard Bullen – University of Canterbury Research Fellow, Canterbury Museum

Powdered green tea (matcha), was first imported from China in the late 12th century. This illustrated talk by Associate Professor Richard Bullen will describe the history of the tea ceremony in Japan, and the influence Chinese ideas had on the practice of serving tea and its environment.

Saturday 9 February | 1pm

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